Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
STATION
CSPAN2 52
LANGUAGE
English 52
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
, international crisis group and the u.s. institute of peace. he has helped fund schools in darfur in refugee camps, now belongs to a satellite project with george clooney. mr. prendergast has worked for peace in africa for well over a quarter of a century. then we will hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at stanford university's hoover institution, and professor, lecture and african studies at johns hopkins university school of advanced international studies. mr. dizolele has testified several times before the congress. his work has appeared frequently in many major news publications, and he is a frequent commentator on african affairs on television and radio. he served as election monitor in the drc in 2006, and again in 2011. and has also been indicted with united nations peacekeepers as a reporter. in addition, he is a veteran of the united states marine corps. thank you for your service. and i'd like to now go to steve hege. >> chairman smith, ranking member bass, and members of the subcommittee on africa's global health and human rights, thank you for this invitation to
have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by other powers we want to sustain a presence in the asia-pacific. same to is the middle east. as you look at these different areas i think that there are terrific opportunist who engage with china on each of them. and to fundamentally ask the question and try to answer the question secretary clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to real
deliver a major boost to u.s. economic growth. i realize that many of our colleagues have different priorities when it comes to fixing our broken immigration system, but the reforms contained in the stem jobs act enjoy bipartisan support. so i would urge my colleagues, let's show the world that we can agree on this common sense, bipartisan immigration reform. let's do something for our economy and let's take this first step in our broken -- solving our broken immigration system. now, let me say, before i turn the floor over to my colleague from kentucky, who i know has some comments on this topic, let me address two issues quickly and that is, i can anticipate hearing from some of our colleagues, this doesn't solve all of what's broken in our immigration system and i concede that that's correct. but what we need more than anything is to develop some confidence-building measures for the american people to demonstrate that we can come together, republicans and democrats alike, and do what needs to be done, which everybody -- almost everybody agrees is common sense, and then we can fol
a collaborative flee to support the u.s. efforts and what is a very challenging and dynamic security humanitarian and diplomatic context. thank you very much for your testimony. we will take a brief break while the second panel comes. >> we would like to now turn to the second panel one today's hearing about mali and the path forward. our second panel will include mr. niikwao akuetteh and joining us live this is our first attempt at live testimony by google [inaudible] i suspect nobody has testified by this, the thing i didn't know existed. so my thanks to the technical assistance and the policy support of several very capable folks who made this happen. dr. fomunyoh you may begin and we appreciate your testimony today >> thank you, chairman to an and ranking member isaacson pivot on behalf of the national democratic institute, have the opportunity to discuss the political developments in mali. today crisis is two-thirds of the country which is humanitarian and has admitted for under 50,000 people. the political uncertainty in the capitol and the severe food shortage that is affecting the entire
the state department released a review of the attack on the u.s. consulate benghazi and found, could come systemic failures and leadership management deficiencies. just after the report was released, as to state departments testified about the attack before the house foreign affairs committee. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] the committee will come to order. after recognizing myself and the ranking member for seven minutes each for our opening statement we will then hear from our witnesses, deputy secretary william burns and deputy secretary tom, no strangers to what is we can allow the members to question our witnesses correctly as soon as possible we will forgo additional billing statements and instead i will recognize each member for six minutes following the presentation by the witnesses fought secretary clinton was scheduled to be here today but we have had to reschedule if her parents do to the unfortunate injury for which we wish her a speedy and healthy recovery. she has a confirmed once again she has every intention of testifying before our committee by mid ja
climate change is probably not going to be resolved in the next policy and the u.s. -- am optimistic we can make progress. we're making progress by don't think we'll get a national bill to deal with climate change, so that would be top of my agenda. >> assuming the tax reform gets done, i think it's education issues. >> the first thing i would think my bias would be short-term stimulus, long-term deficit reduction, and then immigration reform. and once, if we get past all that, we could have serious conversations about other things. >> that's great. we're going to stay here and we're going to have a quick welcome from jocelyn from fti. she's going to talk to us a little bit more about the polling, the audience polling. she's coming. great. spent then was would do the polling will take questions from the audience. >> aecom everybody. thanks again for being here, and thanks for doing with her technical difficulty. hopefully we are in the click a. so as you can see this is the first poll question that i mentioned, so again, phones and computers at the ready. you can either text or twitch r
be able to know as u.s. senators working to protect the -- the fourth amendment. mr. president, we have always struck a balance in this country between an overbearing government and the important pathway to obtaining information relevant to our national security. the amendment that i'm laying forth strikes that balance appropriately. it urges the process to continue of providing an understanding of what the secret court interpretations are. that's very important in democracy. it provides the appropriate balance with national security. it gives clear decision-making authority to the attorney general in this process and in that sense, it does the best possible path that honors national security concerns while demanding transparency and accountable for this issue of privacy and protection of the fourth amendment. thank you, mr. president. mr. wyden: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon. mr. wyden: how much time for purposes of general debate remains on our side and how much under the control of the distinguished chair of the committee? the presiding officer: the op
of judge paul william grimm of maryland to be a u.s. district judge for the district of maryland. i'm very proud of the process that senator mikulski has instituted for us making recommendations to the president to fill judicial appointments. i believe that under this process, we have reached to get the very best to recommend to the president and then to our colleagues for confirmation, and judge grimm clearly falls within this line. the senate judiciary committee favorably reported judge grimm's nomination by voice vote on june 7 of this year. judge grimm was nominated to fill the vacancy in maryland that was created when u.s. district judge benson e.laig took senior status in june. judge grimm brings a wealth of experience to this position. early in his career, he served in the military in the judge advocate corps handling commercial litigation in private practice and served as assistant attorney general of maryland. he also sat as a federal magistrate judge in maryland for 15 years. judge grimm was born in japan and received his undergraduate degree from the university of california in
the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily political will, and i say that with regard to both political parties and the solution that has to be forthcoming in the weeks ahead and the months ahead will require the leaders to first of all put our nation fi
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
this miscalculation. people say, well, you know, mutual assured destruction marched between the u.s. and the soviet union. well, if you look at the history, it actually came very, very close a couple of times, particularly on three occasions. one was the cuban missile crisis . another time was actually less well-known, during the yom kippur war. but in the jerusalem post, a book written about this describing how the american and soviet navies were circling watching each other, get so tired, they almost made a mistake and pulled the nuclear trigger and each other. and finally, just sort of more innocent mistakes, if you look at an example in the 1980's, boris yeltsin, the president of russia, the norwegians had a zero weather rocket that they launched in the direction of russia. then notify the russians, but this time the notification got lost in the mail. the russian generals came and said, look, apparently somebody has lost something in us across our horizon. this is an american nuclear attack you have to miss the launch or russia will be obliterated with no shots back. thankfully was sober that d
today, so thank you. [applause] >> later today you can see a discussion on how u.s. debt slow economic growth and the retirement of baby boomers could lead to a new phase of political and economic development. event is hosted by the american enterprise institute in washington. you can see it live, 5:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> i think people still love discovery. just the channel to the ability find surprises. every month or every year i giggle a little bit about some show that people are suddenly talking about that a don't think you could have ever imagined. if you come to me and say mike, i want you to choose honey boo boo, or the show with the duck guy, or certain food channel network, i don't think that if i had to predetermined that was my practicum i would've ever picked that. but the ability to stumble on them or to hear people talking about them, let me do it into an environment and can go paddling kind of go paddling around in there, so defined, i kind of like honey boo boo and on watching it, i still think that's a huge part of the american television experience. and i
four years because helping u.s. job creators export shouldn't be a partisan issue. over 100 bilateral trade agreements are being negotiated today as we speak here on the floor. the united states is a party to none of them. we are a party to one multilateral trade agreement which i support but we need to get back engaged in bilateral agreements to open markets for our products, our service providers. we have been sittingr hands on the sidelines in an increasingly global and dynamic economy. this is the first administration actually since f.d.r. not to ask for the ability to negotiate trade agreements using expedited procedures. and this is something unique, trade promotion authority in order to negotiate agreements. this administration has yet to even ask for it over the last four years. last year we finally passed the korea, panama and colombia export agreements. hopefully our bipartisan actions today to boost exports to russia will signal a new chapter, for us to engage as a congress and with the administration in a much more ambitious and proactive trade policy. i'm pleased this bip
of the to u.s. patriot missile batteries as part of the nato effort to try to help protect our turkish allies against the threat of missiles from syria. even as we have asserted our strong and enduring commitment to the middle east, we are also renewing and expanding our engagement in the asia-pacific region. the core of our rebounds is modernizing our existing network of alliances and security partnerships throughout the region. and developing new security relations as well. over the past year, we reached major agreements with japan to realize our forces and jointly develop guam as a strategic hub. we afford to strengthen cooperation for the republic of korea, in space, in cyberspace, and intelligence. we begin a new marine rotational deployment to australia as well as increased air force cooperation. likewise, we are deepening our engagement and developing rotational deployment with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality
school, served as a commissioned officer in the u.s. navy and was an assistant u.s. attorney in new york. please welcome alan morrison. [applause] >> thank you, roger. i also have the distinction of two things. one, i read and commented on stuart and rick's book. i don't want to get any medal of honor for that. my name is in the acknowledgments, i found it today, so nobody's come after me yet. laugh and if you think it's insend yea -- incendiary now, you should have read the draft i read. [laughter] i'm one of the few lawyers who did not file a brief in the fisher case. [laughter] okay. so let's begin by remembering that fisher is a concrete lawsuit and not an academic debate about the values of affirmative action. the question in this case is did the university of texas violate the equal protection clause in connection with its undergraduate admission program, and did abigail fisher, was she injured by what the university of texas did? so i want to start by explaining a little more than stuart did about the admissions program and what it's supposed to do and what it's not supposed to do
hospitalized since early december. senator inouye who served in the u.s. house in 1959 before being elected to the senate in 1962 was serving his ninth term in office after winning their reelection in 2010 was 75% of the vote. a winner of the distinguished service cross for heroism, senator inouye lost his right arm in combat during world war ii. he later received a medal of honor along with another number of japanese american soldiers. from bill clinton in 2000. here is a conversation with the senator from 2008. >>> welcome to the latest interview in the united states capitol historical society's series of oral history interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper
: i rise to say what as important day it is for the u.s. coast guard. our communities who benefit from those services, the men and women who answer the call to serve. the reason i say that is because we have passed a bill that gives 40,000 active-duty coast guard members the support they need. it is a worthy tribute to a force of men and women that in 2000 alone helped us save over 3,800 lives across the u.s., confiscated over 166,000 pounds of cocaine and secured over 472 vessels before they arrived at our ports. this legislation will give the coast guard the funds that it needs to upgrade equipment and purchase the right vessels for carrying out every mission that they need. this kind of work exemplifies the heroes like chief petty officer terrell horn of california. officer horn died in the line of duty last week while tracing drug smugglers off the coast of california. our thoughts are with his family and friends. his actions and service remind us of the danger that the task of the men and women of the coast guard do on a daily basis. and that's why it was so important that we pass
of strong missile defense, and more than any other senator he helped ensure that the u.s. had a working nuclear arsenal after the cold war had ended, because in his view, a strong america that can deter a threat is always the best avenue to peace. over the past decade jon has applied that same standard to the war on terror, and no one -- no one has worked harder to explain the threat of islamic terrorism or help equip our nation with the tools we need to confront and defend it than jon kyl. not enough thought has been given to the role of nuclear weapons in american foreign policy and how strategy will evolve as our conventional military is drawn down due to a diminishing investment and how nuclear weapons will be employed to support the articulated strategic pivot to the asian pacific theater. the senate and the country will be well served by jon's thoughts on these challenges over the coming years. fortunately, he's thought ahead by encouraging others to step into the void after he leaves. throughout his time in washington jon has been guided, as he explained in eloquent detail yester
.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for their intellectual property and our farmers will have new tools to fight unscientific trade barriers. if we pass pntr, american exports to russia are expected to double in five years. this bill has strong enforcement provisions to help ensure that american farmers, ranchers, businesses and exporters get the full benefit of pntr. and this bill has strong human rights provisions. senator cardin's magnitsky act
. shadi, there was an article i think on friday in which unnamed u.s. officials were suggesting that morsi might've learned from the last couple of weeks that winner take all is not the way to go and that he needs to reach out to his political opponents. do you think that the brotherhood understands this referendum as in part a referendum on the way it's running politics in egypt? >> to some extent, yes. but i think there's a bigger problem here. the brotherhood is a full access to some of the they are extremely paranoid. they believe the opposition is out to destroy them. they think liberals are anti-democratic and out to bring down who they view to be elected and legitimate elected president. so they're very much in that mode of thinking. and that's what essentially one of their justifications for the authoritarian november 22 decree is, rather leaders told me this is yes, we know it looks bad, we know it's kind of anti-democratic, but the no rules of politics are suspended until future notice because we are in this fundamental turning point. and this is what we have to do. sorry if peop
speaker yesterday at the national press club. he discussed the future of the u.s. and military in afghanistan. also if automatic budget cuts take effect next month. this is an hour. >> good afternoon and welcome to the national press club. my name is theresa werner and by the 105th president of the national press club. [applause] we are the world's leading social organization for journalists committed to our profession's future through our programming and events such as this while fostering a free press worldwide. for more information about the national press club, please visit our web site at www.press.org. to donate to the programs offered to the public through our national press club journalism institute, please visit press.org/institute. on behalf of members worldwide, i'd like to welcome the speaker and those of you attending today's event. our head table includes tests of the speaker as well as working journalists to our club members. and if you hear applause and our audience we would note that members of the general public are attending, so it isn't necessarily evidence
throughout this country across the continental u.s. and in alaska. but not yet in hawaii. over the years, people have mischaracterized the intent and effect of our bill. so let me be plain. for me, as i know it was for dan, this bill is about simple justice, fairness in federal policy, and being a nation that acknowledges that while we cannot undo history, we can right past wrongs and move forward. to us, this bill represents what is pono, in hawaiian, what is just and right. our bill is supported by president barack obama and the departments of justice and interior. it has the strong support of hawaii's governor and the state legislature, and a large majority of the people of hawaii. our bill has the endorsement of the american bar association, the national congress of american indians, the alaska federation of natives, and groups throughout the native hawaiian community. as a senator and senior statesman, senator dan inouye advocated that congress do its job and legislate where native communities were concerned. dan inouye believed that a promise made should be a promise kept. in the d
enough time discussing ways to help them assimilate into civilian life. as the son of a u.s. air force veteran who spent 31 years in the air force, i'm acutely aware, as coul kay is, that it t just those that wear the uniform that serve, but their families as well. many returning vets and their families encounter a whole range of social and economic hardships that can be hard to overcome. most notably, the unemployment rate among our returning vets from afghanistan and iraq is significantly higher than for the general population, something i know kay has worked on extensively. she's also worked to get our veterans the medical assistance, the job training and the financial support they need. indeed, i don't know of any senator that's done more to help america's heroes adjust to life after the military. that's just one of the reasons why she will be sorely missed. here's another reason, though: kay has fought time and time again to promote tax relief for hardworking texas families. in thehooin the mid-1990's, shed create the so-called homemaker ira to make sure that stay-at-home moms and
in. where they're in a fundamental mistakes that the u.s. president made? >> you know, i think on the management of this issue like i said we almost ran into a couple of issues here. but we kept it on the road. i have to say, because you know i think about the last 20 years, 30 years of u.s. foreign-policy, in particular in the last 10 years. i to call it the disciplining impact of working within the alliance. we were genuinely, because this was an alliance, both on the negotiating side because in order to deploy in these countries, government suppression had to take ownership for the negotiation. they weren't going to be sitting at the negotiating table but there was a group that nato called a special consulted the group that enabled these people to go back, the governments in question and say you are part of this process. we are not we are not going to let those americans do these things and i have to tell you there were so many people in the reagan administration that were unhappy hearing the state department arguments over and over again. we can do that because it will disr
and coordinate, these things like nepa, environmental permitting so that all of the federal u.s. dot agencies can serve as a one dot agency and streamline and find that the processes and environmental documents can be conned currently delivered and accepted from one agency to another. they are good at it. we have found some efficiencies and streamlining. i think we can expand that to federal rail administration and continued to great success. the other issue we have had is needing consistence guidance from federal rail on the buy american program. we wholeheartedly agree with and encouraged by america, manufacturing created in the united states, and to continue to grow our nation's economy in that way. at we are in a transitional period and we've had some challenges in trying to get waivers for as much as five months on a cliff for a real-time. that probably shouldn't have taken that long as we're in this transitional period. so figuring out how to accommodate the goal by america but finding a way to get there in a transition period i think would be good. i know i'm out of time, or to enclose. i
office where he was one of just five republicans in a body of 40 in the state senate, and then the u.s. senate. senator brown also famously found time to do a little modeling in his youth and it was through this work that he met his wife gail. i've had the pleasure to get to know scott and gail really well over the last three years. they have two daughters and make an absolutely wonderful family. i'm sure gail, hyla and arianna are very, very proud of scott and just as proud as i am to see his tenure here cut short but they should be proud of the fact that scott has accomplished a lot in three short years here in the senate. he led the charge to repeal a burdensome withholding tax that hurt small businesses, he crafted legislation for crowdfunding which allows job creators to raise start-up funds for their businesses over the internet with less red tape and he introduced legislation to ensure that children's hospitals have access to discounts on orphan drugs that are used to treat rare diseases. all of these bills are now law. as a 32-year member of the national guard, senator brown ta
country from u.s. schools u.s. work forces. together, that is a skills compact that i think the country could easily get behind and support so i think that is highly important as we think of the skills issue going forward. i think some of the issues i heard talked about before are critical to that as well. what are we doing in the pipeline? what are we doing from the earliest ages to make sure underrepresented groups are taking to science? why do we have the dropoff in middle school around young women? when's the long term strategies? i think we have to hit on -- we have to attack this on all cylinders. we have to have an all of above strategy but while we do the long term strategy to have a greater supply of stem workers and high skilled workers, we should not take the eye off what to do in the short term. one of the most powerful statistics from the president's science and technology council was the idea that you could have a significant effect on the number of workers we have if you just ensured there's a high
will absolutely do that with amtrak and our partners at the u.s. dot. >> thank you. my time is up. >> any further questions from any members of the committee? seeing none, i'd like to thank each of our witnesses for your testimony today. i ask unanimous consent at the record of today's agreement open until such time as our witnesses have provided answers to any questions that have been submitted to them in writing. and unanimous consent the record remain open for 15 days for additional comments and information submitted by members for which it is to be included in the record of today's hearing. without objection, so ordered. i'd like to thank our witnesses again for your testimony today. and appreciate your working with our legislative challenge here today. seeing members have nothing further to add, the hearing is adjourned. .. 's retiring senator daniel akaka spoke on the senate floor yesterday about the life and career of senator inouye. these remarks are 15 minutes. >> madam president, it is very difficult for me to rise today with a heavy heart, to bid aloha, aloha to my good friend, colleag
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
from our country, from u.s. schools, from u.s. work force. together, that is a skills compact i think the country could easily get behind and support. so i think that is highly important as we think of the skills issue going forward. and i think some of the issues i heard talked about before are critical for that as well. what are we doing in the pipeline? what are we doing from the early -- underrepresented groups are taking to science? why do have a drop off in middle schools around young women? what are the long-term strategies? i think we have to hit on, we have to attack us on all cylinders. we have to have and all of the above strategy. but while we are doing the long-term strategy to have a greater supply of steam workers and high school workers, we should not take our eye off what we can do in the short term. one of the most powerful statistics that came out of the president's science and technology council was the idea that you could have a significant effect on the number of workers we have, if we just insured that you had a higher graduation rate among those who declare a s
is most important families in the u.s. and also from a person that works and education. and i have to say that this is but a microcosm of a whole nation that is speaking out and saying the congress needs to govern. solve this problem. senator harkin is corrected they created a problem and they can solve the problem let's get the house back to work and get a vote on a very reasonable way forward and let's make sure the middle class, the working poor, and all of the people in the nation 100 percent are cared for in the solution. that's the way forward for we the people, and i thank you very much for coming out today. let us continue our efforts to make sure that we the people can have our well expressed in a congressional decision that in this this foolishness and governs. thank you very much. [applause] >> the so-called fiscal plan that would result in tax increases and spending cuts taking effect new year's day which is tuesday. the newspaper reports that negotiations have shifted to the senate. according to the helpless senate republicans may accept a plan that extends tax cuts for incom
a member of one of the most decorated u.s. military units in american history and one of our nation's longest-serving and finest senators. an iconic political figure of his beloved hawaii and the only original member of a congressional delegation still serving in congress, he was a man who had every reason to call attention to himself but who never did. he was the kind of man, in short, that america has always been grateful to have. especially in her darkest hours, men who lead by example and who expect nothing in return. mr. reid: mr. president, i -- the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: yes, i didn't mention -- i should have, but i'm really -- have been waiting the last hour or so to make sure that it was okay with his wife that i came here and said something, so i haven't had time to do much other than feel bad about senator inouye. as i indicated, i talked to irene. i wasn't able to talk to ken, but i did talk to irene. i want to make sure that everyone understands the depth of my feelings -- i'm speaking for the entire senate. he believed in me more than i belie
this year, when the state of florida sued the u.s. government for court determination of the preclearance under the voting rights act of 1965, preclearance of five counties, for discrimination, and further, sued the u.s. government by questioning the constitutionality of the 1965 voting rights act. in the discovery for that case, the testimony was taken of this former general counsel of the florida republican party. and what i would like you to know is this key individual who, with your permission, with the committee's permission i'd like to insert those documents in the record -- that his testimony, given in april, mr. mitchell said, and it's in the sworn testimony, that he was asked to draft the original version of the legislation that became the law. he was asked to drafted by republican party leaders, specifically after consultations with andy palmer, then the executive director of the florida gop, frank, head of the gop state house campaigns, and joel springer, head of the state senate, republican campaigns. and in early talks with executive director of the florida gop. and with this
12 years until president ronald reagan, a knitted him as an associate justice of the u.s. supreme court. he took his current seat in 1988. in nominating justice kennedy to the supreme court in 1987, president ronald reagan remarked that his career was a judge in the u.s. court of appeals for the ninth circuit as a constitutional law professor and in private practice was marked by the devotion to the simple straightforward principle but we are a government of law and not of men. during the more than three decades on the bench, justice kennedy has played an interpol role in the consideration and the decision of some of the most significant cases and serious constitutional alleges in the nation's history. he's been a staunch defender of the first amendment rights, individual liberty against government intrusion and federalism. these are qualities of the constitutional series and we are honored to have the justice. heritage to provide this evening's lecture. please join me in welcoming the honorable anthony kennedy. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. good afterno
, which exists as both an adversary to certain u.s. interests and a fellow traveler sharing mutual goals and vulnerabilities on others. the ongoing challenge will be for the united states to disce discern, sometimes issue by issue, whether china is an adversary or a partner. and this calibration will impact america's relations with the rest of asia and may ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in this world. while visiting indonesia, thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage to the circumstances with china. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursuit prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen america's economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains
by higher taxes is the creation of some members of the u.s. house and u.s. senate who are funded by these same millionaires. they know little of what makes companies successful." that is the c.e.o. of stride rite shoes. if we extended the upper-income tax cuts for another year, it would add over $49 billion to the deficit. even in washington, $49 billion is real money, money that would have to be borrowed, adding to our debt problem. believe it or not, republicans who voted to turn medicare into a voucher program in the name of deficit reduction, support adding to the deficit with high-end tax cuts. in rhode island at least, those are lousy priorities when it comes to deficit reduction. we should let the tax cuts at the top expire for reasons also of fairness. loopholes and special provisions allow many super high income earners to pay lower tax rates than many middle-class families. according to the nonpartisan congressional research service, 65% of individuals earning a million dollars or more annually pay taxes at a lower rate than median income taxpayers making $100,000 or le
facing the u.s.? .. what kind of role the u.s. president should take in terms of gory realistic short-term approach to facing the challenges were a long-term visionary approach, where the focus is on the future and where we are going in the next 10 to 20 years. so in general, which of the following approaches to governing do you think a u.s. presidential candidate should take? the next screen here will see two options. then to our poll question. should a u.s. president take a practical approach in difficult times addressing near-term challenges qwerty think a president should take a visionary approach focusing on long-term goals for a future in not losing that perspective of where we want to go to. once again, go ahead and tax to 22333 which you agree with or you can tweet to the code they are. we will be interested to see if responses matter of public opinion poll where he found most americans prefer obama take a visionary long-term approach although a fair sized minority, about the 44% range felt that obstacles to be an important focus for our nation. so it looks like once again wer
and telecommunications counsel, and that is increasing capital to -- more foreign investment in u.s. broadcast holding come with. currently broadcasting is the only industry where the fcc maintains a 25% cap which inadvertently limits the amount of capital in u.s. broadcasters, minority broadcasters in particular can get. secondly, i endorse in september what i call an am radio revitalization initiative. minority broadcasters in particular are disproportionate in the am band and it's been 21 years since we revisited our rule of the sec. so one of things i like it is revitalize the band but can't figure if there are any rules which inadvertently not, you know, stand in the way of greater minority ownership on the radio side. thank you, mr. chairman for your indulgence. >> a quick comment. >> if i understand, mr. chairman, that you haven't allocated the funds for this study speak as well, there's a steady -- >> to meet that standard. >> there's a steady ongoing which with allocated substantial funds. that's ongoing and we have request for funds in our 2013 budget that would allow us to move forward with
on the u.s. consul in benghazi, he said he did three directives and one of those was to find those was find a to do this work and bring them to justice. secretary clinton's letter to us just two days ago, she states quote we continue to hunt the terrorists responsible for the attacks in been got seek and are determined to bring them to justice. had to identify the terrorists responsible for the deaths of these four brave americans and the additional injuries and the destruction of u.s. facilities? >> senator barrasso, first just to restate that were absolutely committed to bring those responsible to justice. we are committed to bringing every resource of the u.s. government to bear to accomplish that. we are pursuing this through a number of different channels. some of which can best be discussed in other cities. but as you know the fbi is leading the investigation because the department is very actively supporting this. i've been at liberty to talk to the living leadership about the importance of their cooperation and investigation but i could wear making some progress. ambassador pope wor
, would take number wunsch. >> but we do know that the u.s. spends a larger percentage of its gdp on health care than any of the other developed nations by a fairly significant amount. so really tackling that underlying issue of what percent of our economy is going to health care in general is really the key issue. and we should be focused on that, i think, much more than the federal government's portion of it. and in this case where you have a proposal that would actually increase the share of gdp going to health care is taking us in the wrong direction. >> that is assuming that medicare spending equals medicare costs and, again, as somebody who actually ran the program, i'm not assuming that. >> you want to do that one? sure. >> dade, this one is definitely for you specifically and aarp. the question is this: what scoreable savings proposals does aarp support for medicare beyond just better care coordination? does aarp support means testing, combining parts a and b cost sharing or medigap reforms or anything else? >> i think it's important to remind everybody that we recently ha
requires the government obtain a warrant any time it seeks to conduct direct surveillance on a u.s. person. indirect surveillance of u.s. persons by means of backdoor searches should be no different. no one disputes that the government may have a legitimate need to search its fisa data base for information about a u.s. person, but there is no legitimate reason why the government ought not first obtain a warrant by articulating and justifying the need for its intrusion on the privacy of u.s. persons. our constitutional values demand nothing less. unfortunately, we won't be voting on such an amendment later today. so our reauthorization of fisa will include a grant of authority for the government to perform backdoor searches, seeking information on individual american citizens without a warrant. i believe such searches are inconsistent with fundamental fourth amendment principles. for this reason, i cannot support the fisa reauthorization, and i urge my colleagues to oppose the bill in its current form. i'd like next to speak about a few amendments that i think would make some improvements t
. >> iran, the u.s. drone they claim they shot down. do you have information on that? the navy said it's not theirs, perhaps a cia drone. i don't know. anything that you can tell us about that? >> i can tell you we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning about the type of uav, but, again, no evidence that the claims are true. >> how do you view, though, the fact they have shot some drone -- >> again, we have no evidence to hear the claims are true. i'm not going to comment on something about which we have no evidence in its truthfulness. yes? >> jay, thanks. i want to go back to what the president asked in the interview with bloomberg. during the negotiations with speaker boehner, a year ago, he was willing to consider increasing the eligibility age for medicare recipients and slowing benefits for entitlements, and he said he was willing to look at anything that strengthens our system. can you clarify, are those prams that could strengthen the system, is that what he was signaling? >> i will say a couple things t
. there are variables that will affect that that we cannot control. with the u.s. does and the international financial institutions do is going to matter. morsi cares about with the international community to cares about him. they are sensitive to that because they need outside support to get their economy back on track so there is a point of leverage. if we can use that i might be more optimistic. but in terms of a long-term goal is, it is islam for a reason and they're going to become liberals. all this talk about post islam is unrealistic because we are talking about deeply religious conservative societies where large majorities maybe they don't vote on the basis of sharia but they are sympathetic to public life and they can empower those elements of society to would push them further to the right and that isn't just egypt we see that in other countries where the democracy doesn't always have a moderating effect and they don't have a more islamic egypt and this could be somewhat liberal if not the liberal. >> thank you very much. thank you. this is a fascinating discussion and i appreciate your won
at the u.s. department of housing and urban development, and in this capacity, she has day-to-day oversight of hud's public housing and the voucher programs as well as hud's office on the programs. since secretary eriques, you may proceed with your testimony. >> thank you, and good morning. chairman johnson, ranking member shelby, and members of the committee, thank you for letting me testify this morning on the housing voucher programs. the voucher public housing program provide critical housing assistance in communities across the in this case. these programs serve extremely poor families, many elderly or disabled. not surprisingly, with the recent recession, the demand for rental assistance increased. hud recognizes the urgent need to streamline its rental assistance program in order to reduce burdens on public housing authorities and increase overall efficiency and generate cost savings where possible. in light of the persistent demand for rental housing, we are also working hard to preserve public housing. my testimony today covers three important approaches, streamlining, simp fying t
time really being called out as a problem. problem. >> dysfunction and u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals won't tell you. his latest is an accountable. >> senate finance committee chair max baucus left capitol hill earlier this week to give his thoughts on what's called the fiscal cliff and negotiations that are currently underway. he spoke at an event hosted by campaign to fix the debt, a group cofounded by alan simpson and erskine bowles, the former coaches of the national commission on fiscal responsibility and reform. he spoke for about 15 minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. >> thank you. it was a traffic panel on health care. now we are really going to have a special guest. chairman baucus who is the chairman of the senate finance committee, and we will talk both about the budget negotiations that are going on now and the fiscal cliff, but what's really important is that both senator baucus and his counterpart in the house, chairman camp work together i believe on developing ideas for tax reform will be some of the lead folks who are shepherding whate
will get knocked off by 285 million. 183 million cut from the national parks system. and 129 million in u.s. embassy security and construction. after the whole benghazi thing that could be cut. >> guest: exactly. they're trying to put some of that money back into embassy security i just read. well i heard from the national association of, national parks conservation association that the sequestration cut for them would be the equivalent of shutting down 200 parks with about 9,000 seasonal employees laid off. that would be something people with notice when they go visit. >> host: so both sides are trying to come up with some sort of a compromise so they avoid all the cuts we just talked about. what do republicans want to do? >> guest: they have more emphasis on spending cuts than president obama and john boehner has come up with about $2.2 trillion plan over 10 years. he offered 800,000, i'm sorry, 800 billion in revenues, which he would like to get from tax reform, broadening the base, removing some of the tax deductions. without raising the income tax rates on the higher income households.
economy as the u.s. senate is about to gavel in this morning. they will likely spend more on general speeches. the now to live coverage of thewill senate here onth c-span2. the chaplain: let us pray. god, you have truly been good to us. even when we stumble and fall, your mercy continues to sustain us. lead our lawmakers to realize that the abilities you have given them are only maximized when they are used for your purposes. show them the best way to use their talents and opportunities to honor and serve you. lord, keep them from being so mired in political gridlock that they fail to do what is best for this land we love. may they speak today words that are constructive and helpful, bringing encouragement as well as vision to their work. let your glory be seen in this place. we pray in your holy name. amen. the presiding officer: please join me in reciting the pledge of allegiance. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the cle
and fabulous and amazing. pick your favorite color this is brand new u.s. the first audience to see id.it is scheduled tonight but i did not think it will be there so you should get yours now item213-857. i am so excited! we have a lot of fun things coming. we would love to hear from you 1-866-376-8255 >>host: also definitely join us in the live chat we have someone there that will be saying hello to you. we love girls and the live chat. nload that application for free bite diallingtar star hsn.you can also join me on facebook page i am colleen lopez on hsn. i hope you are in the mood for shopping because we have special things in store for you. including the biggest and best value ever on the herkimer quartz is our beautiful earring today's special, hit it comes [♪ music ♪] >>host: look at the gorgeous collette she is dripping and herkimer. if you fell asleep last night, we knew this would be popular but almost 16,000 are out the door. majority of our day supply gone in the midnight showing. if you have been looking for the most gorgeous uniquely beautiful earring (...)this wi
to take you live now to the u.s. senate as they are about to resume. senators are considering an extension of the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. in about 45 minutes, we're expecting a vote on an amendment to the fisa bill, this a vote on final passage. the house passed it in september, and if the senate passes without amendment, it heads to the president for his signature. the senate is expected to move to a $60 billion spending bill for hurricane sandy victims. we're expecting up to 21 amendments on that bill. now live coverage of the u.s. senate here on c-span2. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. almighty god, before whom the generations rise and pass away, watch over america and use our senators to keep it strong and good. imprint upon their hearts such reverence for you that they will be ashamed and afraid to offend you. remind them that their thoughts, words, and deeds are under divine scrutiny. bless also the many others who work faithfully on capitol hill and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52